jeudi 28 août 2014

Do you realize that you've created my music? Charanjit Singh - Ten Ragas to a Disco Beat, vol. 1




PLAYLIST

01 - " Raga Madhuvanti ", Charanjit Singh, Synthesizing: Ten Ragas to a Disco Beat, 1982 
02 - " Alleys of Your Mind ", Cybotron, 1981
03 - " Cosmic Cars ", Cybotron, 1982
04 - " Clear ", Cybotron, 1983
05 - " Fast Cars ", Z Factor featuring Jesse Saunders, 1984
06 - " Oh Adam ", Tony Humphries, 2014
07 - " No Way Back ", Adonis, 1988
08 - " House Music All Night Long (Armando's Club Mix) ", Armando, 1990
09 - " Acid Tracks ", Phuture, 1987
10 - " Bradley's Beat ", Bradley Strider, (aka Aphex Twin), Rephlex Records, 1991,
11 - " Magic O ", Terrace, Djax Up Beat Records, 1991
12 - " Capsule in Space ", Ceephax Acid Crew, 2012
13 - " Simply Just A Ventage ", Incogdo, Derrick May et Carl Craig, 1992
14 - " Your Love ", Frankie Knuckles, 1987
15 - " End Titles ", Vangelis, bande originale de Blade Runner, 1982
16 - " Breath March ", Aphex Twin, Analord 04, 2005
17 - " Jack Trax ", Chip E, 1985
18 - " بأداء رقصة الدبكة المجرة (Legowelt CyberDabke Dub Version 2) ", Saraya AlSawas, 2014
19 - " Manje Re ", Charanjit Singh, 1973, Bollywood Steel Guitar, Sublime Frequencies, 2008
20 - " Aetheric Vehicle ", Matmos, 2013
21 - " The Robots ", Kraftwerk, 1977
22 - " Problem Areas ", Oneohtrix Point Never, 2013
23 - " Ruhige Nervosität ", Manuel Göttsching, E2-E4, 1984 
24 - " Yaad Aa Raha Hai Tera Pyar ", Bappi Lahiri, Disco Dancer, 1982
25 - " You Should be Dancing ", Bee Gees, Saturday Night Fever, 1977
26 - " From Here To Eternity " Giorgio Moroder, 1977
27 - " Raga Megh Malhar ", Charanjit Singh, 1982

[FR] Aujourd'hui, l'incroyable Ten Ragas for a Disco Beat by Charanjit Singh. Il ne s'agit pas d'une nouvelle production, ni même d'une nouvelle trouvaille, mais un très bon exemple de la réaction que la diffusion d'une musique peut susciter lorsque quelqu'un se rend compte que la musique qu'il aime a un précurseur dans une partie insoupçonnée du monde.

D'abord réalisé en 1983 à Bombay sur la Gramophone Compagny Limited of India et réédité en 2010 sur le label hollandais Bombay Connection, Synthesizing: Ten Ragas for a Disco Beat, comme son nom l'indique fut d'abord conçu comme la transposition de ragas sur un rythme disco.
" There was lots of disco music in films back in 1982 [...]. So I thought why not do something different using disco music only. I got an idea to play all the Indian ragas and give the beat a disco beat – and turn off the tabla. And I did it. And it turned out good [1]. " 
Charanjit Singh, " Charanjit Singh on how he invented acid house ... by mistake ", entretien de Stuart Aitken, The Guardian, 10 mai 2011.
Mais c'est comme une musique proto-techno ou proto-acid house qui s'ignore que l'album fut redécouvert plus de trente années après. On y entend alors divers synthétiseurs éponymes (le clavier Roland Jupiter-8 et le Roland TB-303 que vous pouvez notamment voir flotter dans l'espace dans le clip de Ceephax, piste 12) au côté d'une légendaire boîte à rythme (la Roland TR-808).

Geeta Dayal du blog The Original Soundrack :
" Last week, some friends of mine in New York and London — friends with very good taste in electronic music — told me I absolutely had to listen to 10 Ragas to a Disco Beat, a new reissue on the Dutch label Bombay Connection. The word going around the Internet is that this album, full of 808-driven beats and TB-303 squelches, was recorded by a Sikh fellow by the name of Charanjit Singh in India in 1982 — predating the Chicago acid house revolution of the mid-1980s. To put the year 1982 in perspective, the Detroit techno godfathers Cybotron released “Alleys of Your Mind,” [2] their first single, just one year before, in ’81. (In 1982, they would release “Cosmic Cars,” [3] followed by “Clear” in 1983 [4].) 1982 was also the year that MIDI, the “musical instrument digital interface,” was introduced — but it wouldn’t be until 1983 that the MIDI was actually being used; the first synths to utilize MIDI were the Prophet 600 and the Roland JX3P, both in ’83. Electronic music as we know it now had some way to go. "
Geeta Dayal, " Thoughts on ’10 Ragas To a Disco Beat ", Theoriginalsoundtrack, April 5, 2010.
Robbie Geoghegan de Igloo Magazine : 
" Every once and a while a record comes out that creates a bit of a stir. The latest in this chain comes from an unlikely source, Mumbai. In 1982 Charanjit Singh, with a 303, an 808, a Jupitar 6 made his Synthesizing – Ten Ragas to a Disco Beat. It’s not as much the Mumbai source of this LP that has sparked such interest, it is the equipment and year of its inception. Most will recognize the TB303 and TR808 as the building blocks of the house music movement, but in 1982 house music wasn’t really alive. By ’83 groups like Z-Factor [5] were pioneering house, but Singh and Ten Ragas was already out. So, is this LP the first house record?
In an interview a few years back Tony Humphries [6] summed up the house sound in one word, “mechanical.”  It may be the perfect synopsis for what is considered house, but it depends what house is being defined as. The likes of Adonis and Armando did have a mechanical aspect, looping samples and an unceasing 808 beat [7 - 8]. On the other hand, Phuture had perhaps a less automatic note. With this, earlier house tracks grew from disco [9]. Singh’s tracks have this disco aspect, but not as much as the album’s title might let one believe. As the appellation does suggest Singh wrote this music within the Indian classical of the Raga a series of five or more musical notes upon which a melody is made. What the title doesn’t suggest is the acid lines under which the ragas are made. The ragas are created with the quintessential acid machine, the 303, and it is the only thing that locks the record to any aspects of house. The ragas are an amazingly early, and finally unearthed, examples of what these fledgling electronic machines are capable of. The 808 and 303 have, in some respects been pigeonholed into being “house” machines. Singh is snubs this typecasting. The ten tracks do not have much to differentiate between them, some are faster, some are slower, but they work along the same raga formula. This acidic tracks are not like those of early Rephlex or Djak up Beat records [10 avec les mamies - 11], they were not created for clubs but were made to create Indian influenced music with new equipment. The tracks twist and float on tweaks and swirls of 303 lines, pushing forward under 808 beats with the Jupitar 6 adding a bed of bass. Some of the works have a playfulness to them, almost like Ceephax Acid Crew’s noodling with his big brother’s vintage synths [12]. The ragas are melodic whirling pieces, tracks that were not hampered by genres because there were no genres as the critic’s pen hadn’t had time to invite them yet.
Singh’s LP is not a house record, but that’s not a problem. What Synthesizing - Ten Ragas to a Disco Beat is is a piece of electronic music history. For years this record has laid in the forgotten archives. Singh’s LP is one of the first records to utilize equipment that would later create the house, acid and techno genres and define nearly all aspects of electronic music. But, it is not the issue about Singh being the first to seal these sounds on a 12“s of vinyl that makes this LP so intriguing, it is that no-one else went down similar lines to Singh afterwards. Most artists, when getting their hands on these prized, and expensive, analogue boxes, sought to make music for clubs and inevitably a pseudo movement. Singh made his sounds completely separate to this, there weren’t the likes of a Derrick May or Frankie Knuckles to work with in Mumbai [13 - 14]. Perhaps it is this musical solitude, that is from artists who would embrace the same machines, that gives Synthesizing… such a uniqueness, despite surfacing more than twenty five years ago. Singh’s remoteness, and non-Western influences, give the LP a tone and style that haven’t been replicated; and that is not something that can be easily said today for any electronic record. "
Robbie Geoghegan, Igloo Magazine, d'après la page de Bombay Connection. 
" I had heard of this record through the years, like the same way you might hear of Bigfoot, Chupacabras,or Nessie. It was a myth, something that just should not be, a rumor that in 1982 an electronic acid house record was made in India with rollin 808s and layered 303 and 909-like sounds. I came across acid house and acid music in oh i dont know, maybe 1988? something like that. Eventually, the myth came to reality, and in my hands landed a reissue of the mythic record, and yes it does and did exist, and India was rockin acid house in 1982, wow. " 
Automatixromantix, Discogs, 31 août 2012.
" If Blade Runner was remade as a trigger-happy Bollywood film, and soundtracked by Aphex Twin instead of Vangelis [15], it’d march to the acid-techno beats of this rather awesome reissue. Originally released in 1982 (!), it’s the very definition of ahead-of-its-time.
" Now Playing: A Roundup of Records Reviews, Including Candy Claws, Charanjit Singh, adn Zola Jesus & La Vampires ", Selftitledmag.com, 10 septembre 2010.
" Then of course there is a rumour it may just be Aphex Twin. " 
D'après Phuturelabs, 6 avril 2010. 
Aussi improbable que l'était le disque, la rumeur selon laquelle l'album de Charanjit Singh n'était qu'un canular organisé par Aphex Twin, Ceephax entre autres compositeurs eu droit de cité pendant un certain temps :
" Serious find here – 1983 proto-techno made in India – An absolute treasure trove of early electronicdance music that sounds like Aphex's Analord [16] transported to early 80's Mumbai do not miss! 
Charanjit Singh’s ‘Ten Ragas To A Disco Beat’ is quite easily one of the maddest records we’ve ever had in stock. [...] He basically created a sound which mirrored, and more importantly, pre-dated the first acid house record – Phuture’s ‘Acid Track’ by five years [9], and even preceded Chip E’s ‘Jack Trax’ in 1985 [17]. It’s no throw-away novelty record either, instead capturing the hypnotic potential of acid music in the most ornate and scarily prescient fashion, making explicit the similarities of infinitely arpeggiated bass sequences and pure electronic pulses that would soundtrack dancefloors for the next 30 odd years. The more cynical among you will probably be thinking this is Ceephax or Aphex Twin delivering one of the most elaborate in-jokes of their career, but with the gatefold sleeve depicting the original sleeve and some in-depth liner notes from the label and Charanjit, our cynicism is waning in favour of absolute shock and awe. 
Boomkat, d'après la page de Bombay Connection.
"Hah! I really really hope this isn’t Danny Wolfers [18] or Richard D James [c'est-à-dire Aphex Twin]  playing a joke on everyone.
Hpluson, d'après la page de Bombay Connection.
This is so absolutely brilliant and bonkers, that when we first heard it, we thought it must be fake, some modern day Rephlex artist [le label d'Aphex Twin] putting everyone on, taking the piss, with a “raga-techno” album supposedly from the early ’80s. But, no joke, this is the real thing! In 1982, Charanjit Singh, a famous Bollywood composer (he was featured on Sublime Frequencies amazing Bollywood Steel Guitar compilation [19]), had a plan to translate ancient traditional Indian classical ragas to the synthesizer. Using the very synths that would later define Acid House (Rolands TB-303 and TR-808!), Singh unwittingly created a proto-acid masterpiece, before the techno genre ever existed. Since only a hundred or less copies were made originally, this release was mostly a rumor since its creation. We vaguely remember Drew Daniel from Matmos talking about it on Pitchfork [20], a couple of years back, saying someone should reissue it, but we weren’t ready for how incredible and ahead of its time it sounds. Imagine if Kraftwerk [21] (or even Oneohtrix Point Never [22]) started composing music for a Bollywood Rave. Or imagine a more raga-inspired take on another proto-acid classic, Manuel Gottsching’s epic E2-E4 [23]. While the “disco” rhythms are fast and frenetic and don’t really vary that much between tracks (they’re not really disco beats per se, but more akin to acid’s trancey bounce), the synth flourishes and squelches of the raga over the top are soaring and floaty, making the tracks deliriously hypnotic. Capturing acid house’s lysergic transcendence but with an outsider’s economy that refuses to date it specifically to the era. While we only have the double lp, there will be a cd release sometime in the next month or so. But don’t sleep on the vinyl too long as it’s highly limited, and we guarantee there is not another release quite like this one in your collection. Highest Recommendation! 
D'après Aquarius Records
Drew Daniel du groupe Matmos : 
This is an electronic disco album from India that came out in 1983 that my friend Ryan Junell passed on to me. Though the "what the hell is THIS?" factor is high, it's not a campy novelty record, nor does it resemble the full-dress kitsch Bollywood classic Disco Dancer [24 génialissimus] (Bombay's must-see response to Saturday Night Fever [25]). It turns out that a nonstop Roland drum machine pulse and sleek Moroder-esque arpeggios make a killer bed upon which to play classical ragas on analogue synthesizers [26]. On "Raga Meghmalhar" [27], a monsoon raga drizzled with crispy white noise storm sound effects, the endlessly spiraling melodic patterns of synthetic santoors and veenas click so seamlessly with the Munich-style bassline chugging and lockstep kick drum that Singh's antique futurism feels completely inevitable. PS: Reissue labels take note, this thing is ready to take a cosmic disco dancefloor to a higher plane. "  
Drew Daniel, "Found Sound 2006", Pitchfork Staff , 15 janvier 2007.
Ceephax :
" I made it in thirty three years time, with the help of a time machine and some clever shapeshifting equipment procured from a monoatomic gold salesman I met on a beach in Tuvalu in 2036. "  
Ceephax, d'après la page de Bombay Connection.
[EN] Today, the wonderfull Ten Ragas to a Disco Beat by Charanjit Singh. Not a brand new release, or a brand new excavation, but a very good instance of what reaction the circulation of music can produce when somebody found out that the music he or she likes has antecedents in some unsuspected parts of the world.

First released in 1983 in Bombay on The Gramophone Compagny Limited of India and re-issued in 2010 on Deutsch label Bombay Connection, Synthesizing: Ten Ragas for a Disco Beat, as the name suggests, was first conceived as the transposition of ragas on a disco beat. 
"There was lots of disco music in films back in 1982 [...]. So I thought why not do something different using disco music only. I got an idea to play all the Indian ragas and give the beat a disco beat – and turn off the tabla. And I did it. And it turned out good [1]." 
Charanjit Singh, "Charanjit Singh on how he invented acid house ... by mistake", interview by Stuart Aitken, The Guardian, May 10, 2011.
But more than thirty years later, the album was re-discovered as a proto-techno proto-acid house piece of music who ignored itself, using various eponymous synthesizers (a Roland Jupiter-8 keyboard and a Roland TB-303 that you can see flying in outer space on Ceephax's track 12) and a legendary drum machine (Roland TR-808).

Geeta Dayal from The Original Soundrack blog:
"Last week, some friends of mine in New York and London — friends with very good taste in electronic music — told me I absolutely had to listen to 10 Ragas to a Disco Beat, a new reissue on the Dutch label Bombay Connection. The word going around the Internet is that this album, full of 808-driven beats and TB-303 squelches, was recorded by a Sikh fellow by the name of Charanjit Singh in India in 1982 — predating the Chicago acid house revolution of the mid-1980s. To put the year 1982 in perspective, the Detroit techno godfathers Cybotron released “Alleys of Your Mind,” [2] their first single, just one year before, in ’81. (In 1982, they would release “Cosmic Cars,” [3] followed by “Clear” in 1983 [4].) 1982 was also the year that MIDI, the “musical instrument digital interface,” was introduced — but it wouldn’t be until 1983 that the MIDI was actually being used; the first synths to utilize MIDI were the Prophet 600 and the Roland JX3P, both in ’83. Electronic music as we know it now had some way to go.
Geeta Dayal, "Thoughts on ’10 Ragas To a Disco Beat", Theoriginalsoundtrack, April 5, 2010.
Robbie Geoghegan from Igloo Magazine: 
"Every once and a while a record comes out that creates a bit of a stir. The latest in this chain comes from an unlikely source, Mumbai. In 1982 Charanjit Singh, with a 303, an 808, a Jupitar 6 made his Synthesizing – Ten Ragas to a Disco Beat. It’s not as much the Mumbai source of this LP that has sparked such interest, it is the equipment and year of its inception. Most will recognize the TB303 and TR808 as the building blocks of the house music movement, but in 1982 house music wasn’t really alive. By ’83 groups like Z-Factor [5] were pioneering house, but Singh and Ten Ragas was already out. So, is this LP the first house record?
In an interview a few years back Tony Humphries [6] summed up the house sound in one word, “mechanical.”  It may be the perfect synopsis for what is considered house, but it depends what house is being defined as. The likes of Adonis and Armando did have a mechanical aspect, looping samples and an unceasing 808 beat [7 - 8]. On the other hand, Phuture had perhaps a less automatic note [9]. With this, earlier house tracks grew from disco . Singh’s tracks have this disco aspect, but not as much as the album’s title might let one believe. As the appellation does suggest Singh wrote this music within the Indian classical of the Raga a series of five or more musical notes upon which a melody is made. What the title doesn’t suggest is the acid lines under which the ragas are made. The ragas are created with the quintessential acid machine, the 303, and it is the only thing that locks the record to any aspects of house. The ragas are an amazingly early, and finally unearthed, examples of what these fledgling electronic machines are capable of. The 808 and 303 have, in some respects been pigeonholed into being “house” machines. Singh is snubs this typecasting. The ten tracks do not have much to differentiate between them, some are faster, some are slower, but they work along the same raga formula. This acidic tracks are not like those of early Rephlex or Djak up Beat records [10 with the breakdancing grandmas - 11], they were not created for clubs but were made to create Indian influenced music with new equipment. The tracks twist and float on tweaks and swirls of 303 lines, pushing forward under 808 beats with the Jupitar 6 adding a bed of bass. Some of the works have a playfulness to them, almost like Ceephax Acid Crew’s noodling with his big brother’s vintage synths [12]. The ragas are melodic whirling pieces, tracks that were not hampered by genres because there were no genres as the critic’s pen hadn’t had time to invite them yet.
Singh’s LP is not a house record, but that’s not a problem. What Synthesizing - Ten Ragas to a Disco Beat is is a piece of electronic music history. For years this record has laid in the forgotten archives. Singh’s LP is one of the first records to utilize equipment that would later create the house, acid and techno genres and define nearly all aspects of electronic music. But, it is not the issue about Singh being the first to seal these sounds on a 12“s of vinyl that makes this LP so intriguing, it is that no-one else went down similar lines to Singh afterwards. Most artists, when getting their hands on these prized, and expensive, analogue boxes, sought to make music for clubs and inevitably a pseudo movement. Singh made his sounds completely separate to this, there weren’t the likes of a Derrick May or Frankie Knuckles to work with in Mumbai [13 - 14]. Perhaps it is this musical solitude, that is from artists who would embrace the same machines, that gives Synthesizing… such a uniqueness, despite surfacing more than twenty five years ago. Singh’s remoteness, and non-Western influences, give the LP a tone and style that haven’t been replicated; and that is not something that can be easily said today for any electronic record."
Robbie Geoghegan, Igloo Magazine, on Bombay Connection page
"I had heard of this record through the years, like the same way you might hear of Bigfoot, Chupacabras,or Nessie. It was a myth, something that just should not be, a rumor that in 1982 an electronic acid house record was made in India with rollin 808s and layered 303 and 909-like sounds. I came across acid house and acid music in oh i dont know, maybe 1988? something like that. Eventually, the myth came to reality, and in my hands landed a reissue of the mythic record, and yes it does and did exist, and India was rockin acid house in 1982, wow.
Automatixromantix, Discogs, August 31, 2012.
"If Blade Runner was remade as a trigger-happy Bollywood film, and soundtracked by Aphex Twin instead of Vangelis [15], it’d march to the acid-techno beats of this rather awesome reissue. Originally released in 1982 (!), it’s the very definition of ahead-of-its-time.
"Now Playing: A Roundup of Records Reviews, Including Candy Claws, Charanjit Singh, adn Zola Jesus & La Vampires", Selftitledmag.com, September 10, 2010.
"Then of course there is a rumour it may just be Aphex Twin.
From Phuturelabs, April 6, 2010. 
Improbable as the record was, the rumour that Charanjit's album was an hoax schemed by Aphex Twin, Ceephax among other electronic composers held for a time:
"Serious find here – 1983 proto-techno made in India – An absolute treasure trove of early electronicdance music that sounds like Aphex's Analord [16] transported to early 80's Mumbai do not miss! 
Charanjit Singh’s ‘Ten Ragas To A Disco Beat’ is quite easily one of the maddest records we’ve ever had in stock. [...] He basically created a sound which mirrored, and more importantly, pre-dated the first acid house record – Phuture’s ‘Acid Track’ by five years [9], and even preceded Chip E’s ‘Jack Trax’ in 1985 [17]. It’s no throw-away novelty record either, instead capturing the hypnotic potential of acid music in the most ornate and scarily prescient fashion, making explicit the similarities of infinitely arpeggiated bass sequences and pure electronic pulses that would soundtrack dancefloors for the next 30 odd years. The more cynical among you will probably be thinking this is Ceephax or Aphex Twin delivering one of the most elaborate in-jokes of their career, but with the gatefold sleeve depicting the original sleeve and some in-depth liner notes from the label and Charanjit, our cynicism is waning in favour of absolute shock and awe." 
From Boomkat, on Bombay Connection page.
"Hah! I really really hope this isn’t Danny Wolfers [18] or Richard D James [aka Aphex Twin]  playing a joke on everyone.
From Hpluson, on Bombay Connection page.
"This is so absolutely brilliant and bonkers, that when we first heard it, we thought it must be fake, some modern day Rephlex artist [Aphex Twin's label] putting everyone on, taking the piss, with a “raga-techno” album supposedly from the early ’80s. But, no joke, this is the real thing! In 1982, Charanjit Singh, a famous Bollywood composer (he was featured on Sublime Frequencies amazing Bollywood Steel Guitar compilation [19]), had a plan to translate ancient traditional Indian classical ragas to the synthesizer. Using the very synths that would later define Acid House (Rolands TB-303 and TR-808!), Singh unwittingly created a proto-acid masterpiece, before the techno genre ever existed. Since only a hundred or less copies were made originally, this release was mostly a rumor since its creation. We vaguely remember Drew Daniel from Matmos talking about it on Pitchfork [20], a couple of years back, saying someone should reissue it, but we weren’t ready for how incredible and ahead of its time it sounds. Imagine if Kraftwerk [21] (or even Oneohtrix Point Never [22]) started composing music for a Bollywood Rave. Or imagine a more raga-inspired take on another proto-acid classic, Manuel Gottsching’s epic E2-E4 [23]. While the “disco” rhythms are fast and frenetic and don’t really vary that much between tracks (they’re not really disco beats per se, but more akin to acid’s trancey bounce), the synth flourishes and squelches of the raga over the top are soaring and floaty, making the tracks deliriously hypnotic. Capturing acid house’s lysergic transcendence but with an outsider’s economy that refuses to date it specifically to the era. While we only have the double lp, there will be a cd release sometime in the next month or so. But don’t sleep on the vinyl too long as it’s highly limited, and we guarantee there is not another release quite like this one in your collection. Highest Recommendation!"   
From Aquarius Records
Drew Daniel from the band Matmos:   
"This is an electronic disco album from India that came out in 1983 that my friend Ryan Junell passed on to me. Though the "what the hell is THIS?" factor is high, it's not a campy novelty record, nor does it resemble the full-dress kitsch Bollywood classic Disco Dancer [24 wow] (Bombay's must-see response to Saturday Night Fever [25]). It turns out that a nonstop Roland drum machine pulse and sleek Moroder-esque arpeggios make a killer bed upon which to play classical ragas on analogue synthesizers [26]. On "Raga Meghmalhar" [27], a monsoon raga drizzled with crispy white noise storm sound effects, the endlessly spiraling melodic patterns of synthetic santoors and veenas click so seamlessly with the Munich-style bassline chugging and lockstep kick drum that Singh's antique futurism feels completely inevitable. PS: Reissue labels take note, this thing is ready to take a cosmic disco dancefloor to a higher plane." 
Drew Daniel, "Found Sound 2006", by Pitchfork Staff , January 15, 2007.
Ceephax:
"I made it in thirty three years time, with the help of a time machine and some clever shapeshifting equipment procured from a monoatomic gold salesman I met on a beach in Tuvalu in 2036." 
Ceephax, on Bombay Connection page.